How Old Are Canopic Jars?

712–664 B.C.

A set of four canopic jars was an important element of the burial in most periods of Ancient Egyptian history.

Canopic jars were containers in which the separately mummified organs would be placed.

When were canopic jars first made?

The earliest canopic jars, which came into use during the Old Kingdom (c. 2575–c. 2130 bce), had plain lids, but during the Middle Kingdom (c. 1938–c. 1630 bce) the jars were decorated with sculpted human heads; from the 19th dynasty until the end of the New Kingdom (1539–1075 bce), the heads represented the four sons

How big is a canopic jar?

The size of the wide necked canopic jars varied from 5 inches to 10 inches in size. The liver, lungs, stomach and intestines were stored in their appropriate canopic jars decorated with depictions of the four sons of Horus. The liver was protected by the man-headed Imsety.

Who made the first canopic jars?

Canopic jars were used by the ancient Egyptians during the mummification process to store and preserve the viscera of their owner for the afterlife. They were commonly either carved from limestone or were made of pottery.

Which canopic jar holds which organ?

The persons liver, intestines (guts), lungs and stomach were placed in canopic jas. Each organ was placed in a special jar with a top representing an animal or human head.